Why the ‘pandemic’ of food-borne illness in China is not linked to climate change

In a country where one in six people have some form of obesity, there’s a real concern about the impact of climate change on this population.

But while China has its fair share of foodborne outbreaks, many experts say there’s more to the story.

For instance, in 2016, the country recorded more than 100,000 food-related cases, according to the World Health Organization.

And while the outbreak that claimed the life of an American doctor was linked to an outbreak of the coronavirus, scientists have linked it to the country’s increasingly severe winter weather, which has seen an increase in temperatures of 5C or more.

“This is a pandemic, which is the most complex, and it’s going to take some time to understand how it will affect the whole country,” said Professor Peter DeStefano, a leading climate scientist at the University of Reading.

Professor DeSteffano, who is also a visiting fellow at Oxford University, said China’s pandemic was not the first time that the country had faced an outbreak, or the first that the virus had spread rapidly.

In 2014, there were two such outbreaks in the country.

In 2015, there was one, followed by an increase of about 30 per cent in the number of cases in 2016.

“So we have some examples of what happens in the context of a global pandemics.””

As part of its ongoing work, the WHO has been conducting research on the climate and climate change. “

So we have some examples of what happens in the context of a global pandemics.”

As part of its ongoing work, the WHO has been conducting research on the climate and climate change.

Dr DeStefano said that the agency’s focus on climate change was critical.

“The impact of global warming is probably one of the most profound and persistent impacts of the climate change,” he said.

“But we also need to be very careful because we do need to do everything we can to mitigate the impact.”

But there’s another reason that China’s climate and food-safety woes may be more linked to the coronacovirus than it is the pandemic.

Dr DeSteffeano said this is because the food chain has become increasingly dependent on the CO2 that’s released into the atmosphere.

“We’re now living in a world where we’re not going to have to worry about the CO 2 levels in the atmosphere,” he explained.

“And the CO two levels that we’re used to are the CO-2 that comes out of the atmosphere.”

But that’s not to say that the CO levels in China are not increasing, because that is what they were before the pandemias.”CO2 levels are increasing at a steady rate in the air,” he added.

“What we’re seeing is that CO2 levels in cities are going up at a much faster rate than in rural areas.”

That’s going through the system and into the soil, into our food and into our drinking water.

“It’s the result of people in China getting rid of more food and using less food, which means they’re using less water, which creates a more acidic environment for the food.”

There’s an opportunity for CO2 to increase in the environment, but there’s also an opportunity to offset that increase by reducing the use of CO2.

“So that’s the situation we’re in now.”

Topics:health,diseases-and-disorders,health-policy,environment,china,chinas